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Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of Origin of the Chinook jargon on the northwest coast found in the catalog.

Origin of the Chinook jargon on the northwest coast

Frederic William Howay

Origin of the Chinook jargon on the northwest coast

by Frederic William Howay

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  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Oregon Historical Quarterly in [Portland .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chinook jargon -- Etymology.,
  • Chinook language -- Etymology.,
  • Indians of North America -- Northwest, Pacific -- Languages.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby F.W. Howay.
    ContributionsOregon Historical Society.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[29] p. ;
    Number of Pages29
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18956294M

    A History of Treaty Making and Reservations on the Olympic Peninsula. His words were first translated into the Chinook Jargon-a blend of several Indian languages along with French and English that was developed to facilitate trade throughout the Pacific Northwest-and then it was translated into the language or languages used by the various. The jargon incorporated a number of words of English origin; it also borrowed words from French and Spanish. English explorer James Cook recorded several Chinook terms at Nootka, British Columbia in By , Lewis and Clark found use of the jargon was a common feature of Indian trade along the Pacific coast.

    At its heyday in the 's the Chinook Jargon was spoken by some , people, and in fact there are native elders in British Columbia and Washington state who still remember some of the jargon, even though the Chinook language itself had died out by (Lewis, Redish – Native ). origin of CJ was pre-contact, an Indian trade language later picked up and added to by European traders, or post-contact, a result largely of the maritime fur trade on the Pacific coast of North America. It is the purpose of this paper to argue that the historical Chinook Jargon may in fact have had two origins, one in a pre-contact trade.

    dictionaey oe'teb chinookjakgon, ob, tradelanguageoforegon. bygeoegegibbs. newtoek: cramoistpress. ' pd booksFile Size: 1MB. Clowwewalla Tribe History: Article on the Clowwewalla tribe from the Handbook of American Indians. Books for sale on the Clowwewalla Indians A Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest: Book on the history of the Northwest Coast tribes, including a .


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Origin of the Chinook jargon on the northwest coast by Frederic William Howay Download PDF EPUB FB2

Chinook Jargon, also called Tsinuk Wawa, pidgin, presently extinct, formerly used as a trade language in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. It is thought to have originated among the Northwest Coast Indians, especially the Chinook and the Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) peoples. Chinook Jargon is the most accessible of all the Native American languages.

With a small utilitarian vocabulary and straightforward syntax, it was the lingua franca of the Northwest for most of the s. One hundred thousand Native Americans, settlers and immigrants were using it in Cited by: 5.

Chinook Jargon, the trade language of the Northwest Coast, was a combination of Chinook with Nuu-chah-nulth and other Native American, English, and French terms. Chinook Jargon may have originated before European contact. It was used across a very broad territory reaching from California to Alaska.

Week 9 Blog - Chinook Jargon was very prevalent in trade among tribal individuals of the Northwest Coast of North America. Individuals of the Chinook tribe created Chinook Jargon to gain the ability to discuss trade with other local tribes and later on European settlers became familiar with the language.

Edward Harper Thomas wrote the. The Chinook trade jargon (Chinook Wawa) arose as a mixture of words from the various Pacific Northwest tribes who would congregate near Celilo Falls in the Columbia River Gorge to trade, fish, connect and celebrate.

Our salutation, meaning “Welcome Friends”, is in Chinook Jargon (also known as Chinuk Wawa). The purpose of this article is to describe Chinook Jargon, its origins and usage.

Prior to the arrival of white men in the Pacific Northwest in the s, there were many tribes of Indians (the historical term still used in the United States rather than First Nations) in that area.

Chinook Jargon is a Native American pidgin language spoken in the Pacic. Northwest. The story of Chinook Jargon is the story of Native American cul.

ture and Pacic Northwest history. In the s there were over one hundred. different languages spoken in the Pacic Northwest. A dictionary of the Chinook jargon, or, trade language of Oregon Scouler, whose vocabularies were among the earliest bases of comparison of the languages of the northwest coast, assumed a number of words, which he found indiscriminately VI PREFACE.

employed by the Nootkans of Vancouver Island, the Chinooks of the Columbia, and the. Chinook - A History and Dictinary of the Northwest Coast Trade Jargon Hardcover – January 1, by Edward Harper Thomas (Author)Author: Edward Harper Thomas.

The origin of this word for an important person is from the Chinook Jargon muckamuck, meaning food, or when used as a vert to k Jargon, not to be confused with the native American language Chinook, was a pidgin used by traders in the American Northwest with Chinook, Nootka, English, and French at its core.

In the Chinook Dictionary, Demers—like many early historians—erroneously attributed the origins of the Chinook Jargon to Hudson’s Bay Company traders who plied the Northwest in pursuit of furs. Recent scholarship and linguistic analysis, however, argue that the foundations of the jargon predate the arrival of Europeans in the region, and that English and French words were added to an existing vocabulary composed primarily of Chinookan, Salishan, and Mowachahtan (Nootkan.

Skookum is a Chinook Jargon word that has historical use in the Pacific Northwest. It has a range of meanings, commonly associated with an English translation of "strong" or "monstrous". It has a range of meanings, commonly associated with an English translation of.

Chinook Jargon - The Hidden Language of the Pacific Northwest A fun and exciting look at the history, current status and linguistics of the Chinook Jargon pidgin. This book provides the traveler and resident alike with a unique insight into an area where few modern explorers venture – Native American languages.

his time in the Northwest. One of these essays, entitled 'Colonel E. Jay Allen's Reminiscences' (pp. ), contains the following passage about Chinook Jargon (): 'I knew George Gibbs well.

He was a likeable man and a learned student. I was with him while he was compiling his Chinook jar­ gon Size: 1MB.

Chinook Jargon is a trade language that was used extensively in the nineteenth century and first part of the twentieth century for communication between Europeans and First Nations people in much of the Pacific Northwest, including British Columbia. Page vi - Negro-English-Dutch of Surinam, the Pigeon English of China, and several other mixed tongues, dates back to the fur droguers of the last century.

Those mariners whose enterprise in the fifteen years precedingexplored the intricacies of the northwest coast of America, picked up at their general rendezvous, Nootka Sound, various native words useful in barter. Pocket dictionary of the Chinook jargon: the Indian trading language of Alaska, the Northwest Territory and the Northern Pacific Coast.

Created / Published San Francisco, Calif.: Downing & Clarke, Contents Pt. Chinook-English -- Pt. English-Chinook -- The Lord's Prayer in Chinook.

Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet. search Search the Wayback Machine. Featured texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library. Top Full text of "The Chinook jargon and how to use it.

My critical arguments about the origin of Chinook Jargon’s Boston man / bástən mán for ‘American/white people’ have gotten rehashed lately. The long-accepted story has been that this expression has to do with the early coastal fur-trading vessels being “out of Boston”.

The analogies between the Chinook and the other native contributors to the Jargon are given hereafter. The origin of this Jargon, a conventional language similar to the Lingua Franca of the Mediterranean, the Negro-English-Dutch of Surinam, the Pigeon English of China, and several other mixed tongues, dates back to the fur droguers of the last century.

Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon, or Indian Trade Language, of the North Pacific Coast Language: English: LoC Class: PM: Language and Literatures: Indigenous American and Artificial Languages: Subject: Chinook jargon -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc. Subject: Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America -- Languages Category.Chinook: a history and dictionary of the Northwest coast trade jargon: the centuries-old trade language of the Indians of the Pacific: a history of its origin and its adoption and use by the traders, trappers, pioneers and early settlers of the Northwest Coast.Chinook: a history and dictionary of the Northwest coast trade jargon: the centuries-old trade language of the Indians of the Pacific / (Portland, Or.: Metropolitan Press, ), by Edward Harper Thomas (page images at HathiTrust).