Last edited by Tojarisar
Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Music & literature in England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. found in the catalog.

Music & literature in England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

James Emerson Phillips

Music & literature in England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

by James Emerson Phillips

  • 320 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by William Andres Clark Memorial Library, University of California .
Written in English


Classifications
LC ClassificationsML3849 P5
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14793854M

The turbulent 17th century: Civil War, regicide, the Restoration and the Glorious Revolution. The 17th century was a time of great political and social turmoil in England, marked by civil war and regicide. Matthew White introduces the key events of this period, from the coronation of Charles I to the Glorious Revolution more than 60 years later. Books shelved as 17th-andth-century: Candide by Voltaire, Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift, The Spirit of the Laws by Montesquieu, The Diary of Sa.

  In the 17th and 18th centuries, music was written out in manuscript for several purposes. These included the creation of ‘master copies’ from which further handwritten copies could be made when required, the provision of musicians' parts for use in performance and the commercial and non-commercial dissemination of musical works.   And yet, for many, America still seemed a better bet than England. For much of the 17th century, England was in a state of persistent crisis. Between religious ructions, civil war, plague and the 4/5.

  The guide to Seventeenth Century Literature and Culture provides students with the ideal introduction to literature and its context from , including: the historical, cultural and intellectual background including religion, politics and culture during the Civil War, Commonwealth and Restoration - major writers and genres including John Donne, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell and . Papers and pamphlets littered the tables in an 18th century coffee house. Polite conversation led to reasoned and sober debate on matters of politics, science, literature and poetry, commerce and religion, so much so that London coffeehouses became known .


Share this book
You might also like
Everything youve always wanted to know about reading a road map-- but were afraid to ask

Everything youve always wanted to know about reading a road map-- but were afraid to ask

A heritage of Canadian handicrafts

A heritage of Canadian handicrafts

Ralph, A Bug (Open Court Reading)

Ralph, A Bug (Open Court Reading)

Psychotherapy and the dual research tradition.

Psychotherapy and the dual research tradition.

Cultural and religious implications of the organismic model in psychology

Cultural and religious implications of the organismic model in psychology

Social and cultural change

Social and cultural change

Edvard Munch

Edvard Munch

How to read the Bible

How to read the Bible

The journals of Major Samuel Shaw

The journals of Major Samuel Shaw

The origin of the canon of the Old Testament

The origin of the canon of the Old Testament

air seasoning of wood

air seasoning of wood

Visual arts contracts.

Visual arts contracts.

Portrait photography

Portrait photography

Music & literature in England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by James Emerson Phillips Download PDF EPUB FB2

Music & Literature In England in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. [James E.; Bronson, Bertrand H. Phillips] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Phillips, James E.; Bronson, Bertrand H.

Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: The Oxford History of Western Music Examining a wealth of topics, Taruskin looks at the elegant masques and consort music of Jacobean England, the Italian concerto style of Corelli and Vivaldi, and the progression from Baroque to Rococo to romantic style.

politics, art, literature /5(4). Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries book. Read 6 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The universally acclaimed and awar /5. Sponsored jointly by the Library and the Department of English, University of California, Los Angeles, the second invitational seminar at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library was held on 24 October The topic for discussion was the relationship of music and literature in England during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present.

Each book in this superlative five-volume set illuminates-through a representative sampling of masterworks-the themes, styles, and currents that give shape and direction to a. Music & literature in England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; by William Andrews Clark Memorial Library ; Phillips, James Emerson, ; Bronson, Bertrand Harris, Pages: MUSIC &S.

LITERATURE IN ENGLAND IN THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES Papers delivered hy James E. Phillips and Bertrand H, Bronson at the Second Clark Library Seminar^ i^ October igj^ WILLIAM ANDREWS CLARK MEMORIAL LIBRARY Unwersity of California, Los Angeles Preface S V^^poNSORED jointly by the Library and the Depart- ment of English, University of California, Los Angeles, the sec- ond invitational seminar.

A select handlist of references to chapbook literature of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Edinburgh: privately printed by J. Birkbeck. Spufford, Margaret (). Small Books and Pleasant Histories: Popular Fiction and its Readership in seventeenth Century England.

Methuen. Weiss, Harry B. A book about chapbooks. Hatboro. English literature - English literature - The 18th century: The expiry of the Licensing Act in halted state censorship of the press. During the next 20 years there were to be 10 general elections. These two factors combined to produce an enormous growth in the publication of political literature.

Senior politicians, especially Robert Harley, saw the potential importance of the pamphleteer. The Enlightenment – the great ‘Age of Reason’ – is defined as the period of rigorous scientific, political and philosophical discourse that characterised European society during the ‘long’ 18th century: from the late 17th century to the ending of the Napoleonic Wars in This was a period of huge change in thought and reason, which (in the words of historian Roy Porter) was.

Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries The Oxford History of Western Music Richard Taruskin.

The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present.

Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: The Oxford History of Western Music. The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present.

'The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Music succeeds equally as a solid reference text and as a fine collection of related essays.

It fills a large void in the scholarly literature, and it does so in a way that will engage, inform and enthuse a broad spectrum of readers for years to come.'. Music in Seventeenth-Century England.

Scroll down to see more content. Title page of John Hilton, Catch that Catch Can (London: Playford, ), Folger Shakespeare Library.

John Ward, “Weep forth your tears,” performed by Gallicantus with our very own Gabriel Crouch (conductor): Weep Forth Your Tears - YouTube. Music & literature in England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries Author: James Emerson Phillips ; Bertrand Harris Bronson ; William Andrews Clark Memorial Library.

Buy Music in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: The Oxford History of Western Music Revised ed. by Taruskin, Richard (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(8).

Eighteenth Century Collections Online: Part I. Eighteenth Century Collections Online containsprinted works comprising more than 26 million scanned facsimile pages of English-language and foreign-language titles printed in the United Kingdom between the years and While the majority of works in ECCO are in the English language, researchers will also discover a rich vein of.

English folk music. This article is about English folk music. It is not to be confused with ethnic group from England. The folk music of England is a tradition-based music, which has been existed since the later medieval period.

It is often contrasted with courtly, classical and later commercial music. The 17th and 18th centuries. After printing, the next significant influence on music performance was the gradual emergence of the audience, for the relationship between participants in the musical experience—between performer and listener—became polarized.

The first evidence for this shift was the rise of the professional vocal virtuoso about the last quarter of the 16th century, and this development soon had a profound influence on musical style. Rather than relying on temporal, periodic and composer-related phenomena to structure the volume, it is organised by genre; chapters are grouped according to the traditional distinctions of music for the church, music for the theatre and music for the concert room that conditioned so much thinking, activity and output in the eighteenth century.

Hoyle’s dictionary, published inwas one of the many kinds of instructive books on music to reach the English public during the eighteenth century. There is nothing distinctive about it and, in common with most books of this type, it was heavily indebted to similar publications of an earlier date.

In this regard, Johnston particularly stresses that the main elements of mid 17th-century apocalyptic ideas were still present in the apocalyptic trends of late 17th-century England, and these concepts indeed continued to play a major role in English religious life well into the 18th century, among both mainstream Anglicans and Dissenters.

The 17th century is a period, which many English historians and literary scholars prefer to any other. During most of it England had her own course both in her political and literary life.

After Queen Elizabeth's death James VI of Scotland became King James I of England in J Like Elizabeth he tried to rule without parliament as much as possible.